Month: Feb 2020

Results of social media polls on AARTO

Thank you to those who participated in our polls on social media regarding your knowledge on AARTO and whether you want it to be implemented nationally in June 2020. Below are screen captures of the results of our Facebook and Twitter polls, together with one run by Pigspotter, who has a large follower base.

While some may say that those who participated represent a fraction of a percent of the driver population (which is 100% correct), there is a good reason for this.

You see, just like was the case with a survey conducted by the RTIA in 2017, the questions we asked were intentionally loaded. The only difference is that it is easier not to participate on social media than when you are ambushed a licensing department, while standing in a queue.

Why do we say the questions were loaded? Well, because the normal human reaction to a question that asks if you know EVERYTHING there is to know is to not want to look ignorant – or to put it bluntly – stupid.

The loaded nature of the second part of the question plays to people’s sense of reasonableness. After all, what reasonable and law-abiding motorist would not want a points-demerit system to finally come into play in South Africa, when it has been promised for so long? The first “victims” of it would be minibus taxi drivers, right?

It was not our intention to dupe anyone, just to conduct a social experiment. With that said, it seems a tad unlikely that Mr Monde Mkalipi of the RTIA was being truthful when he said “most South Africans want the AARTO Act” when the sample results below appear to indicate the exact opposite.

To be fair, no-one can make a decision either way unless they do know EVERYTHING there is to know about the AARTO Act (or anything else for that matter).

It has been our observation over more than a decade that motorists know very little about the prosecution instruments relating to road traffic offences, and even less about the AARTO Act. This is simply NOT their fault.

That said, it is our stance that the RTIA, being the government enterprise tasked with educating motorists on the AARTO Act should have made some progress in the eleven and a half years the AARTO Act has been in force in Tshwane and Johannesburg. It is apparent that it has made little, if any at all.

IF the AARTO Act does come into force nationally in June 2020, motorists are in for a nasty surprise and many who regard them as being “law-abiding citizens” (because they pay their traffic fines) will find their driving licenses being suspended quite quickly. If/when that happens, there will be an outcry, but it will be too late to do anything about it.

Please go and have a look at https://aarto.co.za so that you understand the full implications of the AARTO Act. After that, if the small percentage of you who say you know everything there is to know and want it to come into force in June still feel that way, then fine, that is your prerogative.

Facebook poll – run over 48 hours.

Twitter poll – run over 24 hours

Pigspotter’s Twitter poll – run over 24 hours

The RTIA’s 2017 survey

Below is the survey the Road Traffic Infringement Agency conducted in 2017. As you will see if you click on this link, this is the only “research paper” available on the RTIA’s website.

RTIA_Survey_2017

The time has long since passed to formalise the “blue light protocol”

It can be terrifying to see blue flashing lights in your rear-view mirror, particularly with the prevalence of bogus cops on South Africa’s roads. So why is there no formal way to deal with this scary situation?

JOHANNESBURG – On 6 December 2019 Justice Project South Africa announced the withdrawal of its endorsement of the “Combatting of Blue Light Gangs Protocol” (often shortened to the “Blue Light Protocol”) it had developed together with the Road Traffic Management Corporation in late 2013.

This arose from an increasing number of violent attacks on and threats levelled against motorists by genuine law enforcement officials who appeared to either be unaware of the protocol or had deliberately chosen to disregard it.

The protocol was intended to protect motorists from attacks by criminals posing as law enforcement officials, together with the brutality sometimes perpetrated by overzealous law enforcement officials.

Shortly thereafter, a revised protocol was developed and sent to the Police Ministry by anti-crime activist Yusuf Abramjee, for consideration for it to be ratified and incorporated into SAPS standing orders. We have heard nothing further from SAPS since then.

Today, the office of the Provincial Commissioner of the SAPS, Gauteng put out a media release in which the Provincial Commissioner advised motorists who felt uncertain about the authenticity of law enforcement officials trying to stop them, to follow the protocol, which he shortened into a paragraph which reads:

“This type of crime is real. Members of the public are thus urged to exercise caution and in the event that they suspect that they are being stopped by bogus cops, put on their hazards and drive to a nearby police station or even a filling station. Motorists should also have the SAPS 10111 number on speed dial and make the call when it is safe to do so.”

Peculiarly, in December 2019, Brigadier Vish Naidoo – national spokesperson for SAPS denied the existence of the former protocol which has been on the Arrive Alive website since November 2013. He authoritatively said: “if police tell you to stop, you must stop” and “people must stop undermining the authority of the State”.

Abramjee, who has come out in open support of the protocol says: “We need this blue light protocol as a matter of urgency. Motorists are scared of stopping and one can understand why. We’ve had a number of incidents recently again where bogus cops have attacked motorists.”

“I have today made contact with SAPS to request an urgent meeting with SAPS legal services officials and the Provincial Commissioner but feel this matter urgently needs to be escalated to the National Commissioner,” said Howard Dembovsky, chairperson of JPSA.

“It is very dangerous for the top brass of SAPS to advise motorists to take precautionary measures to avoid falling foul of bogus cops, while simultaneously failing to formalise the protocol so that every law enforcement official is aware of it and follows it, without resorting to violence and abuse,” he concluded.

SAPS media release appears below:

Office of the Provincial Commissioner of the SAPS, Gauteng
13 February 2020
MOTORISTS URGED TO REPORT POLICE OFFICERS USING UNDUE FORCE ON THEM FOR FAILING TO STOP AT NIGHT
Parktown – Management of the SAPS in Gauteng has noted with concern, a social media post accusing police of brutality in relation to motorists being stopped, particularly at night.
The post further suggests that police refused to open a case for a complainant after one such incident, citing reasons that management will now look into and take action should any wrongdoing be found.
Police management views these allegations in a serious light, and wish to assure the public that action will be taken against any member found on the wrong side of the law. Gauteng Provincial Commissioner, Lieutenant General Elias Mawela is calling upon the person who drafted this specific social media post to contact police to lay a formal complaint or open a case. The person may visit their nearest police station, call the Crime Stop number 08600 10111 or give a tip off on the MySAPS app that can be downloaded onto any smartphone. Information will be treated with confidentiality.
In the meantime, police on 08 February 2020, arrested two alleged blue-light hijackers in Mabopane. This came as a result of intense investigations after police picked up a trend in a number hijackings where motorists were hijacked by either a VW Polo and/or a silver Corsa sedan, both fitted with blue lights.
“This type of crime is real. Members of the public are thus urged to exercise caution and in the event that they suspect that they are being stopped by bogus cops, put on their hazards and drive to a nearby police station or even a filling station. Motorists should also have the SAPS 10111 number on speed dial and make the call when it is safe to do so,” advised the Provincial Commissioner.
Police management will ensure that awareness is raised internally to ensure that members ultimately approach this type of situation rationally.
For media enquiries:
Captain Kay Makhubele
SAPS Gauteng
082 xxx 0402