Traffic Law

Draft AARTO Regulations published for public comment

Minister of Transport – Fikile Mbalula

JOHANNESBURG – Draft regulations in respect of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences (AARTO) Amendment Act are inconsistent with the Constitution and are likely to result in further legal challenges. This is according to Justice Project South Africa Chair, Howard Dembovsky.

The regulations were published in the Government Gazette number 42765 of 11 October 2019, and can be downloaded at:  http://www.gpwonline.co.za/Gazettes/Gazettes/42765_11-10_Transport.pdf

“The draft regulations provide a more complete picture which should have been available during the public consultation phases,” Dembovsky said. “But they go far beyond merely amending the existing regulations – they repeal all the existing regulations and create an entirely new set of regulations,” he said.

“The ‘consultations’ held by the national and provincial legislatures when the AARTO Amendment Bill was being discussed centred only on the Act,” he continued. “But the draft regulations comprise over a hundred pages with scores of new provisions,” he commented.

Although an Act is passed by Parliament, regulations may be made by the Minister without the scrutiny of the legislature. Dembovsky said that this practice was flawed and allowed regulation without Parliamentary oversight.

The foundations of the AARTO Act itself are already set to face a constitutional challenge brought by Dembovsky in April 2018. That matter is to be heard in the Pretoria High Court in early 2020 and is largely unaffected by the AARTO Amendment Act, which is likely to face its own legal challenges.

“At a first reading, the regulations appear to have been rushed to completion and leave many details to the discretion of functionaries and institutions instead of providing clarity on exactly how the processes outlined in the AARTO Amendment Act are to function,” Dembovsky explained. “In particular, the regulations virtually ensure that road users seeking to challenge infringement notices will be confronted with onerous bureaucratic hurdles.”

Dembovsky urged members of the public, and especially legal professionals, to scrutinise the draft regulations, and to submit their comments, objections and suggested amendments before the 10 November deadline.

“In JPSA’s view, a comment period of 30 days is far too short to allow thorough public scrutiny of a complete re-write of regulations pertaining to the recent extensive re-write of the AARTO Act,” he said. “Notwithstanding our encouragement to the public to submit their comments, we believe that the comment period should be extended substantially and call on the Department of Transport to do so,” he concluded.

Footnote:

To make sense of the draft regulations, it is necessary to have the AARTO Amendment Act at hand. The Amendment Act can be downloaded at: http://www.gpwonline.co.za/Gazettes/Gazettes/42648_19-8_Act4of2019AdminiAdjudicRoadTrafficOffencesAmendAct.pdf

Have your say: AARTO Amendment Bill hearings – NCOP Western Cape

JOHANNESBURG – It has come to the attention of Justice Project South Africa that the Western Cape Provincial Parliament is to hold public hearings on the AARTO Amendment Bill in Cape Town, starting next Thursday, 15 February 2018. These hearings form part of the process before the National Council of Provinces votes on the Bill, and motorists are strongly encouraged to take the time to participate in this process.

At this stage, JPSA is not aware of any scheduled public hearings in the other eight provinces, but we will keep an eye on things and will notify the public if or when we are made aware of other events.

The AARTO Amendment Bill seeks to amend many of the current provisions of the AARTO Act, in preparation for the national implementation of the AARTO Act, whereafter the long awaited points-demerit system is expected to be introduced.

“This may sound like good news to law-abiding motorists who have grown tired of the lawlessness on our roads, but there are numerous provisions of the currently applicable AARTO Act which, along with the proposed amendments contained in the AARTO Amendment Bill will literally make your hair stand on end,” says JPSA’s chairperson, Howard Dembovsky.

“For example, the AARTO Act does not interest itself with whether you are guilty or innocent of the infringement with respect to which a traffic officer issues an infringement notice to you”.

Whereas motorists are currently permitted to elect to exercise their constitutional right to a fair trial if they believe that they are not guilty, the AARTO Amendment Bill removes this “option” and replaces it with a Tribunal which may only be approached if one makes an unsuccessful written representation. Upon such an approach, which must be made within 30 days of the adverse outcome of a representation, the fee prescribed by the Minister of Transport must be paid to the Tribunal, for it to review the decision of a representations officer.

This is by no means the sole provision in the AARTO Amendment Bill that rings the wrong kind of constitutional bells and the Bill and the existing AARTO Act are full of provisions that JPSA believes will fail to pass constitutional muster.

The public hearings in Cape Town are scheduled to be held as follows:

DATE

TIME VENUE AREA

Thursday
15 February 2018

17:00 Bellville Civic Centre
Voortrekker Road

Bellville

Monday
19 February 2018

17:00 New Hall
Solomon Tshuku Avenue
Site C

Khayelitsha

Tuesday
27 February 2018

17:00 Mossel Bay Town Hall
Marsh Street

Mossel Bay

Wednesday
28 February 2018

17:00 Moffat Hall
Dahlia Street
Mount Pleasant

Hermanus

Thursday
1 March 2018
17:00 Kathy Johnson Multipurpose Centre
Bloekom Avenue

Clanwilliam

 

Written submissions will also be accepted and must reach Ms Shareen Niekerk (sniekerk@wcpp.gov.za), Committee Coordinator, fourth floor, Provincial Legislature Building, 7 Wale Street, Cape Town, by no later than 12:00 on Friday 30 March 2018.

You may download the AARTO Amendment Bill, 2015 as well as the currently applicable AARTO Act from http://www.wcpp.gov.za/ncop-legislation.

Below is the invitation sent out by the Western Cape Provincial Parliament’s Standing Committee on Transport and Public Works:

 

Section 35 of the National Road Traffic Act.

Road Traffic Offences for which your driving licence MUST be suspended

Abstract

On a monthly basis, we receive a mountain of enquiries from people who have been informed that they are to be summoned to appear in court on “No Admission of Guilt” (NAG) matters and it is becoming untenable to reply to each and every enquiry repeating what is mostly a standard response. For this reason, we have decided to put this web page up so everyone comes to understand the seriousness of these matters and hopefully avoids falling foul of the law. Continue reading

Summonses & written notices issued under the Criminal Procedure Act

Important advisory regarding summonses issued under the Criminal Procedure Act.
Issued by Justice Project South Africa (NPC) in the interests of public awareness
Authored by Howard Dembovsky

Executive Summary

Next to actually going to jail, incurring a criminal record is one of the most serious things that can happen to anyone.  It is part of the deterrent factor that laws and law enforcement tries to project in order to instil and maintain law and order.

But when people incur criminal records on an arbitrary, wholesale basis because they have been misled into believing that the “responsible thing to do” is to pay their traffic fines, a grotesque perversion and miscarriage of justice can be the only result. Continue reading